Author Info: A Buffalo native, Natalie Hill is best known for her unique vocals and indie style. Yet it's her heart for seeing students lives transformed by the power and love of Jesus that makes her a quality leader. She serves on the staff team at American University Chi Alpha. 


I remember sitting in American University’s Bender Arena on graduation day, listening to my favorite anthropologist and activist speaking to a room full of graduates on the very thing I spent my whole college career studying.  I remember wondering how many students were lucky enough to get to hear directly from the people they learned about, studied, and emulated so much throughout college.  I remember seeing pictures of friends during their graduation from Georgetown University with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger photobombing in the crowd.  I remember reading books in class written by distinguished AU grads or watching them on major news networks or reading their articles in the newspaper and thinking, this city has a lot of influence.  And I got to be there.

This phrase “City Heart” has been bouncing around our Chi Alpha offices a lot this year.  Honestly it’s a term we’ve been describing for a while, but until this year hasn’t really had a name (and we all know everything sounds better when it has a name).  It’s our way of simply saying that we have a heart for this city.

Yes, I work for American University and we have staff at Georgetown and there are Chi Alphas on many different campuses all over the country, but sometimes that makes us forget why we came here in the first place.  It was to reach this city.  I remember sitting in my commencement ceremony, watching student after student cross the stage, get their diploma, and enter a world where they’d have a lasting impact, one that could affect this nation and even the whole world.  They came to Washington, DC because they knew it was a city that produces difference-makers.  It’s a city that creates people who will impact the world.  I couldn’t help but think I was looking at future CEOs, ambassadors, inventors and innovators, creators of charities that would provide resources for the underprivileged, and the next generation of leaders.

It’s easy to get caught up in the ins and outs of my campus and forget the big picture, which is to reach some of the smartest, driven students in the world and have an impact on the nations.  

It’s to create an urban hub where we can train leaders and send people out to affect their families, workplaces, governments, cities, and countries.  Our dream is that DC could be a place where US missionaries come to train and are sent into other urban places that have yet to be reached.  And maybe it can be a place where we can show others that there is a need for ministries in hard places because it can have a deep impact.

I think the city, DC and others, scares people.  It’s expensive; it’s harsh; it’s exhausting.  The people are hard to reach.  They’re smart and often don’t believe in ultimate truth, especially if it’s coming from Christians.  It’s a difficult place to raise a family, and it’s a transient place, making it hard to establish community. I struggle with all this at times.

“City Heart” is our way of reminding ourselves that it’s worth it.  It’s our way of reminding ourselves why we’re here - why we’ve chosen to support raise for a living, why we live in studio apartments or with multiple roommates, why we live in community with other Chi Alpha staff and college students, why we spend some evenings going to Georgetown and praying for other campuses, why our lives are 24/7 surrounded by others, and why we’ve devoted our lives to colleges in Washington, DC.  It’s our reminder of why God called us here, no matter the cost, because we know the impact we can have is beyond worth it.

Reach this city.  Reach the world.  City Heart.

And as you consider serving with us, or as you pray and give towards this, you are developing a city heart that is truly making a difference. 


Syndicated & Updated on July 21, 2017 • Short Link: http://bit.ly/2twIdIu

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TagsVision

What is Reach the City? Our annual, ten-day fundraising campaign to raise $10,000 which well help us connect with 400+ students during Welcome Weeks (also called Fall Startup).

The Story & Details via Blane Young:

Update (July 21, 2016 at 3:31pm): We are on Day 2 of 10 and we've already raised $1,400. Help us reach our goal, whether it's a small gift or a big one, it's going to take a team of people to make this a reality! (Give Now)

Let me tell you where that money goes. That money doesn't go to staff salaries or anything that. All of us, we raise our own funds through our personal support raising; donors, and churches, but this is a chance for you to invest directly into our ministry because between August through October we call it Welcome Weeks or Fall Startup.

We host almost two dozen events on two strategic campuses in Washington D.C., American University & Georgetown University, We're able to host those events and personally connect our current students and our staff with over 400 incoming students because of the funds raised from Reach the City that put on and allow us to host those events.

You have an opportunity to impact a freshman, an international student, a transfer student that you may never personally meet. A student like Greg. Have you met Greg yet? (read more)

And many others, like XY and Beatrice. And so many more. 

Ways to Give:

On Razoo via: https://www.razoo.com/us/story/Reach-The-City-2016

*** For other ways, especially for churches, please visit dcchialpha.com/invest

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AuthorBlane Young
CategoriesStaff Posts

Author Info: Josh is passionate about studying the Bible and having deep conversations with college students at American University and Georgetown University. In his spare time, he can be found with a book, a video game, or outdoors in a hammock, normally fueled by caffeine. You can connect with him via our AU Chi Alpha Staff Page. 

Growing up in south Georgia, the summer months were sweltering. However, almost on a weekly basis, there would be great thunderstorms that rolled through the area. When this happened, I would get out of the swimming pool, go inside and wait it out with a good book. Summer reading was never a problem for me, and I still find myself yearning for those times of listening to the rain and jumping into a literary adventure. 

This summer, I am reading through a few books for personal enjoyment and spiritual/leadership development. Here’s a few of the books that I would recommend adding to your reading list if you wanted to join in! 

1) “The Caped Crusade: Batman and the Rise of Nerd Culture” - Glen Weldon

In this book, Glen Weldon examines the cultural history of the Dark Knight, and why so many people in culture today identify with the Batman movement, and what it has to say about us. Totally worth your time, whether you are a comic book fan or not! 

2) “Mission at Nuremberg: An American Army Chaplain and the Trial of the Nazis” - Tim Townsend

This book tells the historical account of Henry Gerecke, an Army Chaplain who was assigned to minister to the twenty-one imprisoned Nazi leaders awaiting trial for crimes against humanity. If you are a history buff, this is definitely a must-read! 

3) “Blue Like Jazz: Nonreligious Thoughts on Christian Spirituality” - Donald Miller

Donald Miller recounts his spiritual journey in this series of essays, offering a thought-provoking critique of the Christian institution, and arguing for an emotional experience with God. 

4) “Leaders Who Last” - Dave Kraft

In this book, Dave Kraft talks about healthy leadership in three main areas: Foundations, Formations, and Fruitfulness. This is a beneficial read for anyone in leadership, or even anyone who has a position of influence. 

5) “College Ministry in a Post-Christian Culture” - Stephen Lutz

The university is one of the most strategic ministry fields in the world. This book is for those who are working or planning on working on a college campus, and Stephen Lutz addresses the challenges that campus ministers face in a post-Christian culture. 

6) “Steve Jobs” - Walter Isaacson

In this biography of the late Apple co-founder and CEO, Isaacson writes about the life of one of the greatest leaders of this decade. Many lessons on innovation, leadership, and character can be learned from the life of this visionary leader. 

7) “The Lost World of Adam and Eve: Genesis 2-3 and the Human Origins Debate” - John Walton

John Walton explores the human origin story in Genesis 2-3, endeavoring to discuss these events in light of the cultural and textual world of the ancient Near East. A thought provoking read as Walton explores the dichotomy of Christian theology and competing scientific claims. 

8) Emotionally Healthy Spirituality - Peter Scazzero

It is impossible to be spiritually mature if one is emotionally immature.  Scazzerro writes on his story and this integration of emotional health and Christian spirituality, and then offers seven biblical ways to break out of emotional distress and into the realm of emotionally healthy spirituality. 

9) “Jesus of Arabia: Understanding the Teachings of Christ through the Culture of the Arabian Gulf” - Andrew Thompson

“Jesus of Arabia” looks at the similarities and differences of Christianity and Islam from the context understood by a Middle Eastern audience. What did Jesus actually say? Andrew Thompson, chaplain at Abu Dhabi’s Anglican church, expounds upon the teachings of Jesus and their impact on the Middle East then, and now.


Published on July 5, 2016 • Short Link: http://bit.ly/29hUfqM

Posted
AuthorOther
CategoriesStaff Posts

Author Info: A Buffalo native, Natalie Hill is best known for her unique vocals and indie style. Yet it's her heart for seeing students lives transformed by the power and love of Jesus that makes her a quality leader. She serves on the staff team at American University Chi Alpha. 

I remember sitting in American University’s Bender Arena on graduation day, listening to my favorite anthropologist and activist speaking to a room full of graduates on the very thing I spent my whole college career studying.  I remember wondering how many students were lucky enough to get to hear directly from the people they learned about, studied, and emulated so much throughout college.  I remember seeing pictures of friends during their graduation from Georgetown University with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger photobombing in the crowd.  I remember reading books in class written by distinguished AU grads or watching them on major news networks or reading their articles in the newspaper and thinking, this city has a lot of influence.  And I got to be there.

This phrase “City Heart” has been bouncing around our Chi Alpha offices a lot this year.  Honestly it’s a term we’ve been describing for a while, but until this year hasn’t really had a name (and we all know everything sounds better when it has a name).  It’s our way of simply saying that we have a heart for this city.

Yes, I work for American University and we have staff at Georgetown and there are Chi Alphas on many different campuses all over the country, but sometimes that makes us forget why we came here in the first place.  It was to reach this city.  I remember sitting in my commencement ceremony, watching student after student cross the stage, get their diploma, and enter a world where they’d have a lasting impact, one that could affect this nation and even the whole world.  They came to Washington, DC because they knew it was a city that produces difference-makers.  It’s a city that creates people who will impact the world.  I couldn’t help but think I was looking at future CEOs, ambassadors, inventors and innovators, creators of charities that would provide resources for the underprivileged, and the next generation of leaders.

It’s easy to get caught up in the ins and outs of my campus and forget the big picture, which is to reach some of the smartest, driven students in the world and have an impact on the nations.  It’s to create an urban hub where we can train leaders and send people out to affect their families, workplaces, governments, cities, and countries.  Our dream is that DC could be a place where US missionaries come to train and are sent into other urban places that have yet to be reached.  And maybe it can be a place where we can show others that there is a need for ministries in hard places because it can have a deep impact.

I think the city, DC and others, scares people.  It’s expensive; it’s harsh; it’s exhausting.  The people are hard to reach.  They’re smart and often don’t believe in ultimate truth, especially if it’s coming from Christians.  It’s a difficult place to raise a family, and it’s a transient place, making it hard to establish community.

“City Heart” is our way of reminding ourselves that it’s worth it.  It’s our way of reminding ourselves why we’re here - why we’ve chosen to support raise for a living, why we live in studio apartments or with multiple roommates, why we live in community with other Chi Alpha staff and college students, why we spend some evenings going to Georgetown and praying for other campuses, why our lives are 24/7 surrounded by others, and why we’ve devoted our lives to colleges in Washington, DC.  It’s our reminder of why God called us here, no matter the cost, because we know the impact we can have is beyond worth it.

Reach this city.  Reach the world.  City Heart.


Published on June 29, 2016 • Short Link: http://bit.ly/292wRS0

Posted
AuthorBlane Young
CategoriesStaff Posts
Domo__s_Snow_Day_by_AkatsukiAkuma53421.jpg

AUTHOR INFO Written by Blane Young exclusively for DC Chi Alpha and AU Chi Alpha. You can connect with him via Twitter or Facebook

1. Watch a Movie on Netflix! If you don't have an account, borrow the login info from a friend or sign-up for a free trial. Plus, websites like Wired.com & Huffington Post both have articles on the best streaming content that you may not know about. Even better, watch with a friend (or your entire dorm)! 

2. Journal! Whether you currently keep a journal or not, a day like today (with minimal distractions) is a perfect day to jump into the habit. You can use lists to recount your best and worst moments of 2013, jot down people that you'd like to pray for or simply do a brain dump. It's cathartic, we promise! 

3. Call Home. Yeah, we're going there! On days like today (and especially if your family lives far away), you can be sure that the 24-hour news cycle has been feeding them images of the city that make it look like a scene from The Day After Tomorrow. Set their fears at ease, ask about their week and for once, call without asking for money (or at least, too much money). 

4. Register for Winter Retreat. Like most students we've talked to, you're planning on going but you have yet to register. Isn't that true? Well, it help us (your beloved staff) to know whose coming so that we can have as much time as possible to plan transportation and logistics. As if that's not enough incentive, this event usually comes scarily close to selling out and let me just say, you're not going to want to miss it. (xawinterretreat.com

5. Watch A Sermon (or 5!). Whether you want to catch up on what you missed during Christmas Break from your church (like NCC or Capitol Life) or find a new Podcast Pastor - today is a great day! And in case you didn't make the trek to Texas with us last year, all of the messages from The World Missions Summit 3 are now on YouTube

6. Pray for 20 Minutes. We know, it sounds simple but usually isn't what you'd call exciting or engaging. Think again, folks. We've found some great tips on this interesting site. 

7. Read A Christian Classic. This is a great one to start with and it's totally free! It's called The Pursuit of God and it was written by A.W. Tozer. We promise, you'll thank us. 

8. Throw Snowballs at People. It's helpful if you know them already, but usually fun either way! 

Add Your Thoughts

What are your favorite activities on days like this? 



Posted
AuthorBlane Young
CategoriesStaff Posts